Grand Intervention: LA Civic Center Vision

Grand Avenue Intervention:
Submission Gallery

Los Angeles Civic Center Vision 

Submitted by JC Comia, Edvin Santiago, Matthew Rodriguez, Alex Sandiego, Ester Sun, Cal Poly Pomona

Diversity is Los Angeles’ greatest strength. In the 1960s, migration transformed Los Angeles into the country’s major port of entry for immigration, making it the world’s most ethnically and racially diverse metropolis. Today, Los Angeles is divided into different districts, promoting varying types of culture, art and lifestyle.

Due to its diversity, there are different types of industries which have contributed to downtown Los Angeles’ economic growth. On the other hand, it also has created differences among these districts, resulting in a lack of connection and interaction. By bringing culture, uniqueness and importance from each district to the heart of Los Angeles, it will work as a cohesive diverse place.

By implementing specific design criteria, the sense of place found in each district can be extended along connective corridors terminating at thresholds between the park and each district. Along each corridor streetscape design representing each district’s spatial experience found only within that district, will be employed. Different elements such as texture, color, form, architecture, plant material and symbology can be used to spark interest in users from that district to explore those connective corridors, eventually leading to the heart of the city where many different communities can participate in activities promoting social interaction.

BUILDINGS
? Propose adding mixed use buildings (retail + housing) to provide low income type for students and institutions

BANNERS
? Additional street banners will be included for events occurring in Bunker Hill District

TREES
? Columnar trees are used along sidewalk to provide flow and directions to pedestrians

SIDEWALK
? Sidewalk will be extended 10 ft. to allow more space for activities and interaction of pedestrians
? Extension of sidewalk will allow a semi-private space for pedestrians
? This will also provide outside tables for restaurants
? Outdoor benches along trees

BUILDINGS
? Propose adding mixed use building (retail + housing), mid-ranged priced restaurants, institutional fashion art college, and parking
? To attract diverse group of people
? To provide affordable housing
? To provide a dynamic site

STREETS
? Propose a pedestrian-friendly sidewalk and streets. Design an aesthetically pleasing site
? To create safer streets and sidewalks
? To provide a wider sidewalk for retail stores and small restaurants (tables for customers)
? To create interest and curiosity with focal points that will promote mobility towards the civic center

PLANTS
? Propose plants functionality and aesthetics
? Trees will provide shade and a sense of direction

FOCAL POINT
? Propose a visual element (red star)
? To create a sense of identity and establishment
? To create a sense of direction and interest

OBJECTIVE: Creating Physical Connection to the Civic Park

BUILDINGS
? Mixed-use development would increase occupation of the area by incorporating affordable housing as well as necessary commercial stores

STREETS
? Sidewalk dimensional allows for mid-size pedestrian traffic as well as potential outdoor cafes, 4 lane street, rather than 6, still accommodates traffic needs while creating more pedestrian-friendly crosswalks

PLANT MATERIAL
? Specific plant palette designated for the area would increase the Japanese ambiance in the streets

SITE AMENITIES
? Using Japanese-inspired items such as boulders, lanterns, and wooden fence to decorate the site according to the theme

MAIN STREET / LOS ANGELES STREET ANALYSIS

BRICK PATHWAY
? To extend the marketplace atmosphere found along Olvera Street, brick pedestrian paths will adorn the newly proposed retail and dining corridors

STREETSCAPE DEMENSIONS
? Large sidewalks allow for outdoor dining while one-lane streets provide a pedestrian-friendly atmosphere

COLORS
? Warm colors would be all around, from the foliage of the trees to the brick paths

TEXTURE
? El Pueblo being one of the oldest areas of Downtown calls for aged and worn textures

BROADWAY STREET ANALYSIS

DESIGN ELEMENT
? The park includes Chinese architecture, art and sculpture to introduce the Chinese culture
? There are banners promoting area activities and programs
? Threshold on Chinatown
            i.e., a grove of trees (Chinese Pistache, Chinese Elm) 
            Bright colored wall

BUILDING
? Chinatown consists of retail stores and housing
? There are plazas that accommodate resident needs

GREENBELT
? Connecting Chinatown threshold to Civic Center by using greenway
? It opens up to the district creating a park adjacent to proposed high school

THE GREAT LAWN
Here you can see how major and minor pedestrian paths lead users in a linear fashion. Also this section of the park includes an attractive landmark and a main gathering area. The orange overlay indicates the retail and commercial section of the park.

CIVIC PLAZA SPACE
In this section of the park it was important to mix paved urban space with pocket green spaces. As does the Great Lawn section, the civic section has a landmark. Once again the main pedestrian paths are in the same linear fashion as the other sections and secondary pedestrian paths help to circulate around the block.

EMOTIONAL PARK DIAGRAM
This portion of the park offers a slower pace, poised for more secluded activities. Here, you can see one large garden space indicated by the green overlay. Surrounding the large garden is the main pedestrian path. Secondary paths lead through smaller garden plots. Areas of urban plaza are indicated by the blue pentagons, while areas of seclusion are indicated by orange.